Original investigation
Published: 2016-03-15

Mobility and handgrip strength but not aortic stiffness are associated with frailty in the elderly

Department of Internal Medicine, Division of Geriatric Medicine, Erasmus University Medical Center Rotterdam, Rotterdam, The Netherlands
Department of Internal Medicine, Division of Geriatric Medicine, Erasmus University Medical Center Rotterdam, Rotterdam, The Netherlands
Department of Internal Medicine, Division of Geriatric Medicine, Erasmus University Medical Center Rotterdam, Rotterdam, The Netherlands
Department of Internal Medicine, Division of Geriatric Medicine, Erasmus University Medical Center Rotterdam, Rotterdam, The Netherlands
Department of Internal Medicine, Division of Geriatric Medicine, Erasmus University Medical Center Rotterdam, Rotterdam, The Netherlands
Frailty Timed up and Go test 5 Meter Gait Speed test Handgrip strength Aortic stiffness

Abstract

Background and aim. Frailty and several age-related conditions are associated with morbidity and mortality.
This cross-sectional study is conducted to investigate the hypothesis whether frailty is associated with impaired
mobility and handgrip strength, and aortic stiffness.
Methods. A total of 117 consecutive patients of the outpatient Geriatric Clinic, were included in this study.
Frailty is measured using Fried’s Frailty Index. Mobility was assessed with the Timed up And Go test and gait
speed was measured with the 5 meter walk test. Handgrip strength was measured with a handheld dynamometer.
Aortic stiffness was non-invasively measured by the Mobil-O-Graph and aortic Pulse Wave Velocity
(aPWV) was calculated.
Results. 25% of the participants was classified as frail. Mean time for the TUG was 11,1 s (95% Confidence
Interval, 9.4-12.8) for the non-frail participants, 13.5 s (12.4-14.7) for the pre-frail and 18.5 s (16.6-20.4) for the
frail participants. Mean time for the 5MGS was 5.2 s (95% CI, 4.6-5.8) for the non-frail subjects, 5.8 s (5.4-6.2)
for the pre-frail subjects and 9,2 s (8.5-9.9) for the frail subjects. Mean handgrip strength was 30.6 kg (95% CI,
28.3-32.9) for the non-frail, 24.8 kg (23.4-26.,3) for the pre-frail and 20.3 kg (18.1-22.5) for the frail participants.
We did not find differences of aortic stiffness within groups.
Conclusion. Frail participants need significant more time to complete the Timed Up and Go test and the 5
Meter Gait Speed test, and have significant lower handgrip strength. Frail individuals do not have increased
aortic stiffness.

Affiliations

L.M. Kannegieter

Department of Internal Medicine, Division of Geriatric Medicine, Erasmus University Medical Center Rotterdam, Rotterdam, The Netherlands

L. Tap

Department of Internal Medicine, Division of Geriatric Medicine, Erasmus University Medical Center Rotterdam, Rotterdam, The Netherlands

C. Oudshoorn

Department of Internal Medicine, Division of Geriatric Medicine, Erasmus University Medical Center Rotterdam, Rotterdam, The Netherlands

R.L. Van Bruchem-Visser

Department of Internal Medicine, Division of Geriatric Medicine, Erasmus University Medical Center Rotterdam, Rotterdam, The Netherlands

F.U.S. Mattace-Raso

Department of Internal Medicine, Division of Geriatric Medicine, Erasmus University Medical Center Rotterdam, Rotterdam, The Netherlands

Copyright

© Società Italiana di Gerontologia e Geriatria (SIGG) , 2016

How to Cite

[1]
Kannegieter, L., Tap, L., Oudshoorn, C., Van Bruchem-Visser, R. and Mattace-Raso, F. 2016. Mobility and handgrip strength but not aortic stiffness are associated with frailty in the elderly. JOURNAL OF GERONTOLOGY AND GERIATRICS. 64, 1 (Mar. 2016), 2-8.
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